2011 Nissan Murano review

The 2011 Nissan Murano made me feel at home in it. I used to drive a 2006 Murano, and in the 2011, there were some changes, but I was also happy with what hadn't changed. There's not a whole lot to improve upon with the 2011 Murano because it fits families well.

This five-passenger crossover is fun to drive, and it's comfortable enough to be in all day long — even with the kids.

The first thing I noticed about the Murano is its bold grille hasn't changed. Nissan has found its happy place as far as the grille is concerned. That's not to say that everyone will love the grille or the overall design for that matter, but that's what happens when something is unique.

On the road, the Murano is nimble and sportier than most crossovers, and the braking is responsive. It also offers a Sport Mode. While I'm not usually a fan of continuously variable automatic transmissions, the Murano's is flawless. The engine doesn't whine, and it doesn't seem like you're driving a "Jetsons" car; it's just smooth and quiet.

The Murano starts at $29,290 for the base S trim with front-wheel drive. My test car, a SV with all-wheel drive, cost $34,495.

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